Blindness

At a recent meeting of business people in the district, a discussion was held as to ways to make the most of Easter in the promotion of their businesses. In the midst of talk about Easter bunnies and paw prints in shop windows, one brave soul, wanting to be salt and light in his community, asked the question: “Is there going to be anything about the real meaning of Easter?”
He was given the reply: “We decided we didn’t want to get too far into that, it’s really just for the kids.” Now, to his credit, the chair of the meeting did encourage the promotion of Easter church services around the place. But the response of some people to want to distance themselves from the real message of Easter is an interesting indication of where the average person is at with the whole Easter thing.
Christians celebrate Easter because it is the most world-shattering reality you could ever conceive of. Not only does it show us there is life after death, but it rejoices in the incredible reality that we can have a personal relationship with the living God, now, and into the eternity that is life after death. To reduce it to a promotion of rabbits and egg sales indicates how blind people can be to good news of great joy.
Of course, people discount the good news because they see it as the stuff of myth and legend. We may have been celebrating twice a year what God has done in Jesus for 2,000 years and thousands of naysayers have tried to debunk the stories over that time, but it hasn’t gone away. However, bunnies and eggs are less threatening than Jesus – if we keep Jesus in the ‘myth’ category we can live our life without God, which is much preferred.
The sadness is that the blindness that sees rabbits at Easter instead of Jesus, is nowhere near as dark as the blindness that thinks life is better without God.

Ray Robinson

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